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Showing posts from October, 2016

IP and Hair and Beauty

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Jane Lambert

I found rather more materials on IP and hair and beauty industry than I had expected when I started to read the trade literature. Sabrina Tozzi and Rachel Boakes of Baker & McKenzie LLP have contributed IP and the beauty industry: cosmetic concerns? to Issue 50 of IP Pro Life Sciences (12 Aug 2015). Elaine Eggington of IP Pragmatics Ltd, has posted an interesting presentation entitled Innovation in the cosmetics industryto her company's website.

There are also articles about free wifi with its implications for copyright and data protection in a discussion on free wifi in the Legal Lifeline section of the National Hairdressers Federation website.There are links to the PRS for Music and Phonographic Performance Limited websites on the Hair Council links page.

All of this suggests a wider than average interest in, and understanding of, IP in the hair and beauty industry. That is consistent with my experience as a practitioner as I have recently advised a cosmetics su…

IP and Agriculture in the UK

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Jane Lambert

According to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs ("DEFRA"), some 476,000 individuals in the UK were employed or engaged in agriculture contributing £9.9 billion to the country's gross value added in 2014 (see Agriculture in the United Kingdom 2014DEFRA and devolved administrations).

Branding
As most consumers purchase their food from intermediaries there are limited opportunities for farmers who supply those intermediaries to distinguish their produce from those of their competitors. The position is, of course, different if they market directly to the public through their own farm shops or other retail outlets that they control or influence. If they can build up reputation or goodwill it makes sense to register the name, logo or other sign by which they are identified in the market as a UK trade mark.

If goods are produced in a particular manner or meet a specified standard it may be advantageous to use a special type of trade mark known as…